If it seems like I’m talking about the Hour of Code a LOT. . .

. . .that’s because I am!


It is such an exciting program:

Not convinced, check out this ALSC blog post promoting Hour of Code at libraries.



Important Word Press Information

We are seeing unknown administrators setting themselves up on our Word Press websites.  Please check to see if you have this happening on YOUR website. If so, login and follow these instructions, and remove unwanted Admins.  Also, please check to make sure you have no orange circles on your navigation bar, which means all themes, plug ins, and Word Press files are current.  Check often, these are NOT one time only events.  For questions or assistance call or email lclark@nckls.org.

Considering adding Apps to Storytime?

Check out this how to video: Media Mentorship and Using Apps in Storytime!

Apps in StorytimeI found this video through the Let the Wild Rumpus Start blog. The blog is a great resource for storytime and programming ideas. The blog’s author likes STEM stuff and tech, so she’s a good choice if you’re looking for ways to expand the science, technology, engineering, and math in your library programs.


Have you heard the buzz about Teen Media Use?

LOGO_Common_Sense_Media-250x250-c-defaultThe Common Sense organization recently released a report entitled “Common Sense Census: Media Use by Tweens and Teens.” The report looks at and analyzes teen and tween media use based on a large-scale study that explores young people’s use of a full range of media and technology. The report offers a comprehensive picture of the use of media by kids, age 8 to 18 in the U.S., and it may not come as a surprise, but media use is HIGH.

To see highlights or the full report, visit the Common Sense website. You will need to create an account, but it’s free.

Since some of the findings are pretty surprising—like the statistic that teens are using media an average of 9 hours a day not including the time spent for school and homework—they are getting a lot of media attention. The “Diane Rhem Show” focused on the topic this week and provided some good resources for thinking about and managing teen and tween media use, including these tips sheets from the Center on Media and Child Health. This website also has an “Ask the Mediatrician” page where parents can ask a doctor questions about their child’s media use.

Cool New Tool for Storytime Education

0 - 3 Early Experiences Matter

The National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families has just created a cool new tool that is perfect for discovering new educational tidbits to share with caregivers during storytimes or other programs for babies and toddlers. It’s an interactive Baby Brain Map!

The program allows you to select an age range and then learn new things about the way a child’s brain, of that age, is developing. The program asks specific questions tied into each area of the brain, and provides answers in a way that is easy to understand and share. It’s also a great resource to give to patrons so that they can explore it on their own!

Teens’ Top 10 of 2015

YALSA announced the Teens Top 10Teens’ Top 10 for 2015 today!

Here’s a video countdown featuring actress Bella Thorne.

This list is a teen choice list based on books nominated and voted on by teens around the world, starting August 15th and ending during Teen Read Week™. Altogether, over 27,000 votes were cast for the 24 nominees.

The official 2015 Teens’ Top Ten titles are as follows:

  1. “The Shadow Throne” by Jennifer A. Nielsen (Scholastic)
  2.  “I Become Shadow” by Joe Shine. (Soho Teen)
  3. “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” by Jenny Han. (Simon & Schuster)
  4. “My Life with the Walter Boys” by Ali Novak. (Sourcebooks)
  5. “Heir of Fire” by Sarah J. Maas. (Bloomsbury)
  6. “The Bane Chronicles” by Cassandra Clare. (Simon & Schuster/Margaret K. McElderry)
  7. “The Young Elites” by Marie Lu. (Penguin/G.P. Putnam’s Sons)
  8. “The Kiss of Deception” by Mary E. Pearson. (Macmillan/ Henry Holt & Company)
  9. “Since You’ve Been Gone” by Morgan Matson. (Simon & Schuster)
  10. “The Geography of You and Me” by Jennifer E. Smith. (Hachette/Poppy)

For more information about the Teens’ Top 10 list, visit the ALANews site: Official 2015 Teens’ Top Ten titles announced.


Sharona Ginsberg-Movers & Shakers 2015-Community Builders

Sharona Ginsberg was still in graduate school in January 2013 when she read about the lack of places for librarians to exchange information about their experiences with the Maker movement.  A month later, she launched the MakerBridge Project…. Read the rest of this entry »

Halloween Program for Tweens & Teens

mutant toysThe Wisconsin Library Association Youth Services Section has been sharing a years worth of tween and teen programming ideas through their 52 Weeks of YA Programming.This week’s program is perfect for Halloween: Franken Stuffy!

For more Frankenstein Toy event information, check out these sites:


Toys’ Costume Party

Stuffed Animal CostumesIf you’re looking for a different Halloween program this year, consider a costumes for toys Maker party.

Making kid-sized costumes can be overwhelming for an adult, but making costumes for stuffed animals and action figures. . .that’s completely do-able for almost anyone!

This program is perfect for kids aging out of Trick-or-Treating, too. They have the skills to make elaborate, but tiny, costumes and the creativity to think of costume ideas. (Although, you may have to provide the stuffed animals, as they might not want to admit to owning any.)

Supplies to have on hand:

  • Scissors
  • Fabric
  • Needles and Thread
  • Craft Foam
  • Markers
  • Stapler
  • Velcro dots
  • Pompoms
  • Paper
  • Tape and Double-sided Tape
  • Halloween Costume Books for inspiration
  • Stuffed Animals or Toys

(Idea originated with my son.)

Annoying Pop-up

Don’t panic. Just restart.

You may have witnessed or been the recipient of this type of pop-up on your library’s computers. If this occurs on a patron computer just restart the computer and Deepfreeze will clear the pop-up before anything serious happens.  If on your staff PC, give Duane or Richard a call so we can check your computer.Annoying Pop-up

There is no “Registry Failure” and the 855 or 800 number will definitely not connect you to Microsoft support.  Microsoft will never display a number to call.  This is just another example of a FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt) scam to get you to call so they can try to convince you to spend money on a fake computer issue.

—  Richard


Photo Credit: Thanks to Brig C. McCoy

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